/page/2

BEFORE BATGIRL, WEIRDER THAN WONDER WOMAN: LOST SUPERHEROINES OF THE PRE-CODE ERA

saladinahmed:

As I discussed in an earlier post, pre-Comics Code comic books are full of fascinating women superheroes who’ve been more or less forgotten in the decades since WWII. Born in the era of Rosie the Riveter, when there was a national campaign to get women into workplaces, these costumed heroines…

assangistan:

via washingtonpost:

LBJ tapes reveal his push to hire women. 
“For every minute he thought about women’s issues, Johnson thought a day or a week about race issues. That was central to his presidency and his time and to his legacy. But also, as you are making African Americans progress and allowing the civil rights movement to progress, half the people you are helping are women.”
Listen to the actual tapes here!

assangistan:

via washingtonpost:

LBJ tapes reveal his push to hire women.

“For every minute he thought about women’s issues, Johnson thought a day or a week about race issues. That was central to his presidency and his time and to his legacy. But also, as you are making African Americans progress and allowing the civil rights movement to progress, half the people you are helping are women.”

Listen to the actual tapes here!

Light the dark: memorial for Reza Berati and detained refugees 


Photo via Asher Wolf

Light the dark: memorial for Reza Berati and detained refugees


Photo via Asher Wolf

Body of asylum seeker killed on Manus Island to be returned to Iran

What better way to defile the dead than to return the body of a young man you have utterly failed to the place he fled.

How did 37 prisoners come to die at Cairo prison Abu Zaabal?

Some of the stories behind the names behind the numbers.

Barrett Brown's mention by House of Cards creator on CNN

COOPER: All right. Time now for “What’s Your Story?” where the panel shares a story that caught their eyeballs. Let’s start with you. What’s your story?

WILLIMON: Well, folks like Snowden and Bradley Manning have gotten a lot of attention over the past year, but I think Barrett Brown, who’s…

Hieronymus Bosch – The Music Written on This Dude's Butt

chaoscontrolled123:

Luke and I were looking at Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights and discovered, much to our amusement, music written upon the posterior of one of the many tortured denizens of the rightmost panel of the painting which is intended to represent Hell. I decided to transcribe it into modern notation, assuming the second line of the staff is C, as is common for chants of this era.

so yes this is LITERALLY the 600-years-old butt song from hell

Free Barrett Brown on The Day We Fight Back

freebarrettbrown:

Barrett Brown was a noted researcher of mass surveillance techniques. He helped bring to light and spread the word about numerous capabilities which are provided by intelligence contractors under contract to the government, such as persona management, TrapWire, Romas/COIN and others. These…

*is a noted researcher

He’s in prison, not dead.

Pussy Riot is Dead. Long live Pussy Riot.

This is, mostly, a beautiful parting of ways that acknowledges space for both institutional activism and separatist feminism. That the members of Pussy Riot feel they have lost friends and “ideological teammates” is sad and, in my opinion, a shortsighted view. Free people can wield ideological purity; most prisoners cannot even speak it.

There are thousands of anonymous and forgotten political prisoners hidden and dying on regime prisons worldwide. The best and brightest in Iran and Egypt are locked away, coughing in their freezing, dank cells. Barrett Brown and John Kiriakou’s dispatches from Texas and Pennsylvania are but a whisper in the dark; Chelsea Manning has all but stopped writing. Activists struggle to remember Zaineb Al-Khawaja’s name. Prisoners’ families are coerced into silence, hoping their loved ones will be gifted a touch of humanity in exchange.

Quinn Norton was lambasted in some circles for testifying in front of the Aaron Swartz Grand Jury. She has a daughter and a life; not everyone has the privilege to face the full assault of the state.

The false dichotomy of “reform vs. revolution” is a luxury perpetuated by those without dependents. There is a space and a need for institutional activism. Attempting to force anything different will alienate even the closest of allies and neuter a movement. 

5:07

After years as a Weber adherent I now find myself wondering if the Protestant Work Ethic is a paradox. The harder I work, the less I cling to superstition. Except for the stupid face-up/face-down penny thing; picking up a face-down penny still seems too blatant a defiance.

Update on Course Accessibility for Students in Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria

coursera:

Providing access to education for everyone has always been at the core of Coursera’s mission, and it is with deep regret that we have had to make a change to our accessibility in some countries.

Certain United States export control regulations prohibit U.S. businesses, such as MOOC providers…

Un-sanctioned education

I find I have, for better or worse, very little patience with most of the critics of MOOCs. Their corporate backing is advertised, giving the impression among some that they are more corporate-influenced than traditional institutions. In fact, brick and mortar schools are increasingly filling budget holes with corporate money, even as tuition increases (A quick Google search will yield a number of indy outlets, but the Canadian Journal of Communication has a nice primer; Chris Hedges’ Empire of Illusion is another good read on the topic).

As someone who otherwise has little access to higher education right now and, more importantly, appreciates the global discourse found in MOOC forums, I generally roll my eyes at the majority of critics, who seem to fall into two categories: general contrarian, or purist with an elitist, nougat center. MOOCs aren’t my ideal (I have too close an affinity for the school supply aisle) but they give motivated students access to lectures by professors and professionals from acclaimed universities worldwide, as well as each other: my International Organizations Management course was attended by students from some 20 countries. The real learning happened in the forum discussions, and that is half the point.

I am also aware that the certificates of achievement are generally considered meaningless (I tried to ignore my own embarrassment when I uploaded one of my own to LinkedIn; job searching will make quick work of one’s ego). Coursera especially has tried to give them more credibility, and there I agree with some of the MOOC critics. For about $50 per course potential employers get the kind of assurance that can only come with uploading your ID, taking a skewed webcam photo, and um, registering your unique typing pattern? I refused, out of principle and necessity (did I mention the job search?), but then the Specializations were announced.

Specialization coursework entails three related classes and a Capstone project, awarding a diploma for $200-$500, depending on the subject. I’ve already completed one of the classes in the Challenges of Global Affairs category, and will probably have to both repeat and pay for it, but the experience and endorsement could be well worth the $196 for some people.

Unfortunately, along with the announcement of the Specialization classes came the blocking of Syrian students from the platform entirely.

Just over six months ago, online education platform Coursera thanked a Syrian doctor for a poignant blog post that spoke directly to its mission to change the world by educating the masses.

In a brief, heartfelt post, Dr. Mahmud Angrini explained how the U.S.-based learning portal, initially founded by two Stanford professors, changed his life. After losing everything in the strife that engulfed Aleppo, including his lab, his PhD scholarship, his friends, and his family, he found solace in taking massive open online courses (MOOCs).

“What I can assure you is that Coursera changed my life during those painful months…. [The courses] helped me forget my pain, depression, and suffering, replacing my pessimism with hope and entertainment,” he wrote.

“Nowadays, I always tell my friends in refugee life: ‘It is never too late to start again,’” he continues. ”Someday, the war will end, and we will come back to our homes and our former lives to contribute to the reconstruction process in our country. To do so, we need to learn new skills, and this could only be achieved through continuing education. We can take advantage of the high quality courses that Coursera offers at no cost.”

In an introduction to the post, Coursera’s editor raves, “Thank you, Mahmud, for living Coursera’s mission to create a world where people can learn without limits.”

Yet today, Dr. Angrimi no longer has that lifeline, as Coursera appears to have blocked Syrian IPs since Friday.

“Our system indicates that you are attempting to access the Coursera site from an IP address associated with a country currently subject to U.S. economic and trade sanctions. In order for Coursera to comply with U.S. export controls, we cannot allow you access to the site.”

Coursera has offered Verified courses for about a year, so I am not entirely certain Specializations are the reason Coursera has suddenly decided to enforce U.S. sanctions. But, as Dr. Angrini illustrates, Syrian and Iranian students are already marginalized, denied many of the benefits that come with access to the international community. There is something especially cruel about cutting people off from education.

January 24, 2014:
Seventeen people were reported killed in clashes with security forces across Egypt and another six in three of four bombings in Cairo.
1. Abdul Hamid El-Sayed (Abd Elhamid Elsayed), 23: student, shot in Alexandria during funeral of Amr Khalaf
2. Abdullah Nawarah (19): student, shot in the chest during clashes in Damietta
3. Khatab Mahmoud Taha (40): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo
4. Abdulrahman “Zalabeya” (20): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo
5. Abdel Rahman Abou Bakr (18): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
6. Refaai Abdel Gawad (55): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
7. Ahmed Abdel Rahman (70): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
8. Ahmad Mortada: civil engineering student, killed in clashes in Beni Suef
9. Ihab Ramzy: killed during clashes in Minya
10. Emad Sadek (54): shop owner, shot when he passed ‘closed to clashes’ in Minya
11. Hany Mohammad Abdul Maksoud (29): killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira
12. Islam Ghorab: killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira
13. Muhammad Abdulaziz Yousef, from Al-Minya: killed in Nasr City
14. Mahmoud El-Sayed: killed in clashes in Helwan
15. Basmala Emad Ahmad (4 years old): killed in Fayoum
16. Mohammad Hussein Al-Agamy: killed in clashes in Fayoum
17. Person only identified as a street vendor: killed in clashes in Fayoum
None of the bomb victims were identified by name, though officials did report the Behouth Metro victim was a solider. The four victims of the first bomb, at the Security Directorate building in the Abdeen neighborhood of Cairo, were reported to be police officers, and one person was reported killed in the bomb that hit Haram Street in the Giza district of Cairo.
Sinai insurgent group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis claimed responsibility for all four bombings across the capital today. The group previously claimed responsibility for an attack on a police checkpoint in Beni Suef on January 23 that killed five police officers.
Sources and further details are available as part of an* ongoing project to document the casualties.
Up to 25 demonstrations are reportedly planned across the country tomorrow on the third anniversary of the 2011 revolution, including a march at the Journalists Syndicate in Cairo.
—Photo credit: Cairo Security Directorate - YOUM7/Kareem Abdul Kareem
*let’s not be coy: said project is mine.

January 24, 2014:

Seventeen people were reported killed in clashes with security forces across Egypt and another six in three of four bombings in Cairo.

1. Abdul Hamid El-Sayed (Abd Elhamid Elsayed), 23: student, shot in Alexandria during funeral of Amr Khalaf

2. Abdullah Nawarah (19): student, shot in the chest during clashes in Damietta

3. Khatab Mahmoud Taha (40): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo

4. Abdulrahman “Zalabeya” (20): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo

5. Abdel Rahman Abou Bakr (18): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

6. Refaai Abdel Gawad (55): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

7. Ahmed Abdel Rahman (70): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

8. Ahmad Mortada: civil engineering student, killed in clashes in Beni Suef

9. Ihab Ramzy: killed during clashes in Minya

10. Emad Sadek (54): shop owner, shot when he passed ‘closed to clashes’ in Minya

11. Hany Mohammad Abdul Maksoud (29): killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira

12. Islam Ghorab: killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira

13. Muhammad Abdulaziz Yousef, from Al-Minya: killed in Nasr City

14. Mahmoud El-Sayed: killed in clashes in Helwan

15. Basmala Emad Ahmad (4 years old): killed in Fayoum

16. Mohammad Hussein Al-Agamy: killed in clashes in Fayoum

17. Person only identified as a street vendor: killed in clashes in Fayoum

None of the bomb victims were identified by name, though officials did report the Behouth Metro victim was a solider. The four victims of the first bomb, at the Security Directorate building in the Abdeen neighborhood of Cairo, were reported to be police officers, and one person was reported killed in the bomb that hit Haram Street in the Giza district of Cairo.

Sinai insurgent group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis claimed responsibility for all four bombings across the capital today. The group previously claimed responsibility for an attack on a police checkpoint in Beni Suef on January 23 that killed five police officers.

Sources and further details are available as part of an* ongoing project to document the casualties.

Up to 25 demonstrations are reportedly planned across the country tomorrow on the third anniversary of the 2011 revolution, including a march at the Journalists Syndicate in Cairo.

—Photo credit: Cairo Security Directorate - YOUM7/Kareem Abdul Kareem

*let’s not be coy: said project is mine.

BEFORE BATGIRL, WEIRDER THAN WONDER WOMAN: LOST SUPERHEROINES OF THE PRE-CODE ERA

saladinahmed:

As I discussed in an earlier post, pre-Comics Code comic books are full of fascinating women superheroes who’ve been more or less forgotten in the decades since WWII. Born in the era of Rosie the Riveter, when there was a national campaign to get women into workplaces, these costumed heroines…

assangistan:

via washingtonpost:

LBJ tapes reveal his push to hire women. 
“For every minute he thought about women’s issues, Johnson thought a day or a week about race issues. That was central to his presidency and his time and to his legacy. But also, as you are making African Americans progress and allowing the civil rights movement to progress, half the people you are helping are women.”
Listen to the actual tapes here!

assangistan:

via washingtonpost:

LBJ tapes reveal his push to hire women.

“For every minute he thought about women’s issues, Johnson thought a day or a week about race issues. That was central to his presidency and his time and to his legacy. But also, as you are making African Americans progress and allowing the civil rights movement to progress, half the people you are helping are women.”

Listen to the actual tapes here!

Light the dark: memorial for Reza Berati and detained refugees 


Photo via Asher Wolf

Light the dark: memorial for Reza Berati and detained refugees


Photo via Asher Wolf

Body of asylum seeker killed on Manus Island to be returned to Iran

What better way to defile the dead than to return the body of a young man you have utterly failed to the place he fled.

How did 37 prisoners come to die at Cairo prison Abu Zaabal?

Some of the stories behind the names behind the numbers.

Barrett Brown's mention by House of Cards creator on CNN

COOPER: All right. Time now for “What’s Your Story?” where the panel shares a story that caught their eyeballs. Let’s start with you. What’s your story?

WILLIMON: Well, folks like Snowden and Bradley Manning have gotten a lot of attention over the past year, but I think Barrett Brown, who’s…

Free Barrett Brown on The Day We Fight Back

freebarrettbrown:

Barrett Brown was a noted researcher of mass surveillance techniques. He helped bring to light and spread the word about numerous capabilities which are provided by intelligence contractors under contract to the government, such as persona management, TrapWire, Romas/COIN and others. These…

*is a noted researcher

He’s in prison, not dead.

Pussy Riot is Dead. Long live Pussy Riot.

This is, mostly, a beautiful parting of ways that acknowledges space for both institutional activism and separatist feminism. That the members of Pussy Riot feel they have lost friends and “ideological teammates” is sad and, in my opinion, a shortsighted view. Free people can wield ideological purity; most prisoners cannot even speak it.

There are thousands of anonymous and forgotten political prisoners hidden and dying on regime prisons worldwide. The best and brightest in Iran and Egypt are locked away, coughing in their freezing, dank cells. Barrett Brown and John Kiriakou’s dispatches from Texas and Pennsylvania are but a whisper in the dark; Chelsea Manning has all but stopped writing. Activists struggle to remember Zaineb Al-Khawaja’s name. Prisoners’ families are coerced into silence, hoping their loved ones will be gifted a touch of humanity in exchange.

Quinn Norton was lambasted in some circles for testifying in front of the Aaron Swartz Grand Jury. She has a daughter and a life; not everyone has the privilege to face the full assault of the state.

The false dichotomy of “reform vs. revolution” is a luxury perpetuated by those without dependents. There is a space and a need for institutional activism. Attempting to force anything different will alienate even the closest of allies and neuter a movement. 

5:07

After years as a Weber adherent I now find myself wondering if the Protestant Work Ethic is a paradox. The harder I work, the less I cling to superstition. Except for the stupid face-up/face-down penny thing; picking up a face-down penny still seems too blatant a defiance.

Update on Course Accessibility for Students in Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria

coursera:

Providing access to education for everyone has always been at the core of Coursera’s mission, and it is with deep regret that we have had to make a change to our accessibility in some countries.

Certain United States export control regulations prohibit U.S. businesses, such as MOOC providers…

Un-sanctioned education

I find I have, for better or worse, very little patience with most of the critics of MOOCs. Their corporate backing is advertised, giving the impression among some that they are more corporate-influenced than traditional institutions. In fact, brick and mortar schools are increasingly filling budget holes with corporate money, even as tuition increases (A quick Google search will yield a number of indy outlets, but the Canadian Journal of Communication has a nice primer; Chris Hedges’ Empire of Illusion is another good read on the topic).

As someone who otherwise has little access to higher education right now and, more importantly, appreciates the global discourse found in MOOC forums, I generally roll my eyes at the majority of critics, who seem to fall into two categories: general contrarian, or purist with an elitist, nougat center. MOOCs aren’t my ideal (I have too close an affinity for the school supply aisle) but they give motivated students access to lectures by professors and professionals from acclaimed universities worldwide, as well as each other: my International Organizations Management course was attended by students from some 20 countries. The real learning happened in the forum discussions, and that is half the point.

I am also aware that the certificates of achievement are generally considered meaningless (I tried to ignore my own embarrassment when I uploaded one of my own to LinkedIn; job searching will make quick work of one’s ego). Coursera especially has tried to give them more credibility, and there I agree with some of the MOOC critics. For about $50 per course potential employers get the kind of assurance that can only come with uploading your ID, taking a skewed webcam photo, and um, registering your unique typing pattern? I refused, out of principle and necessity (did I mention the job search?), but then the Specializations were announced.

Specialization coursework entails three related classes and a Capstone project, awarding a diploma for $200-$500, depending on the subject. I’ve already completed one of the classes in the Challenges of Global Affairs category, and will probably have to both repeat and pay for it, but the experience and endorsement could be well worth the $196 for some people.

Unfortunately, along with the announcement of the Specialization classes came the blocking of Syrian students from the platform entirely.

Just over six months ago, online education platform Coursera thanked a Syrian doctor for a poignant blog post that spoke directly to its mission to change the world by educating the masses.

In a brief, heartfelt post, Dr. Mahmud Angrini explained how the U.S.-based learning portal, initially founded by two Stanford professors, changed his life. After losing everything in the strife that engulfed Aleppo, including his lab, his PhD scholarship, his friends, and his family, he found solace in taking massive open online courses (MOOCs).

“What I can assure you is that Coursera changed my life during those painful months…. [The courses] helped me forget my pain, depression, and suffering, replacing my pessimism with hope and entertainment,” he wrote.

“Nowadays, I always tell my friends in refugee life: ‘It is never too late to start again,’” he continues. ”Someday, the war will end, and we will come back to our homes and our former lives to contribute to the reconstruction process in our country. To do so, we need to learn new skills, and this could only be achieved through continuing education. We can take advantage of the high quality courses that Coursera offers at no cost.”

In an introduction to the post, Coursera’s editor raves, “Thank you, Mahmud, for living Coursera’s mission to create a world where people can learn without limits.”

Yet today, Dr. Angrimi no longer has that lifeline, as Coursera appears to have blocked Syrian IPs since Friday.

“Our system indicates that you are attempting to access the Coursera site from an IP address associated with a country currently subject to U.S. economic and trade sanctions. In order for Coursera to comply with U.S. export controls, we cannot allow you access to the site.”

Coursera has offered Verified courses for about a year, so I am not entirely certain Specializations are the reason Coursera has suddenly decided to enforce U.S. sanctions. But, as Dr. Angrini illustrates, Syrian and Iranian students are already marginalized, denied many of the benefits that come with access to the international community. There is something especially cruel about cutting people off from education.

January 24, 2014:
Seventeen people were reported killed in clashes with security forces across Egypt and another six in three of four bombings in Cairo.
1. Abdul Hamid El-Sayed (Abd Elhamid Elsayed), 23: student, shot in Alexandria during funeral of Amr Khalaf
2. Abdullah Nawarah (19): student, shot in the chest during clashes in Damietta
3. Khatab Mahmoud Taha (40): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo
4. Abdulrahman “Zalabeya” (20): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo
5. Abdel Rahman Abou Bakr (18): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
6. Refaai Abdel Gawad (55): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
7. Ahmed Abdel Rahman (70): shot during clashes in Beni Suef
8. Ahmad Mortada: civil engineering student, killed in clashes in Beni Suef
9. Ihab Ramzy: killed during clashes in Minya
10. Emad Sadek (54): shop owner, shot when he passed ‘closed to clashes’ in Minya
11. Hany Mohammad Abdul Maksoud (29): killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira
12. Islam Ghorab: killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira
13. Muhammad Abdulaziz Yousef, from Al-Minya: killed in Nasr City
14. Mahmoud El-Sayed: killed in clashes in Helwan
15. Basmala Emad Ahmad (4 years old): killed in Fayoum
16. Mohammad Hussein Al-Agamy: killed in clashes in Fayoum
17. Person only identified as a street vendor: killed in clashes in Fayoum
None of the bomb victims were identified by name, though officials did report the Behouth Metro victim was a solider. The four victims of the first bomb, at the Security Directorate building in the Abdeen neighborhood of Cairo, were reported to be police officers, and one person was reported killed in the bomb that hit Haram Street in the Giza district of Cairo.
Sinai insurgent group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis claimed responsibility for all four bombings across the capital today. The group previously claimed responsibility for an attack on a police checkpoint in Beni Suef on January 23 that killed five police officers.
Sources and further details are available as part of an* ongoing project to document the casualties.
Up to 25 demonstrations are reportedly planned across the country tomorrow on the third anniversary of the 2011 revolution, including a march at the Journalists Syndicate in Cairo.
—Photo credit: Cairo Security Directorate - YOUM7/Kareem Abdul Kareem
*let’s not be coy: said project is mine.

January 24, 2014:

Seventeen people were reported killed in clashes with security forces across Egypt and another six in three of four bombings in Cairo.

1. Abdul Hamid El-Sayed (Abd Elhamid Elsayed), 23: student, shot in Alexandria during funeral of Amr Khalaf

2. Abdullah Nawarah (19): student, shot in the chest during clashes in Damietta

3. Khatab Mahmoud Taha (40): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo

4. Abdulrahman “Zalabeya” (20): killed during clashes in Imbaba, Giza district, Cairo

5. Abdel Rahman Abou Bakr (18): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

6. Refaai Abdel Gawad (55): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

7. Ahmed Abdel Rahman (70): shot during clashes in Beni Suef

8. Ahmad Mortada: civil engineering student, killed in clashes in Beni Suef

9. Ihab Ramzy: killed during clashes in Minya

10. Emad Sadek (54): shop owner, shot when he passed ‘closed to clashes’ in Minya

11. Hany Mohammad Abdul Maksoud (29): killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira

12. Islam Ghorab: killed during clashes in Housh Eissa, Beheira

13. Muhammad Abdulaziz Yousef, from Al-Minya: killed in Nasr City

14. Mahmoud El-Sayed: killed in clashes in Helwan

15. Basmala Emad Ahmad (4 years old): killed in Fayoum

16. Mohammad Hussein Al-Agamy: killed in clashes in Fayoum

17. Person only identified as a street vendor: killed in clashes in Fayoum

None of the bomb victims were identified by name, though officials did report the Behouth Metro victim was a solider. The four victims of the first bomb, at the Security Directorate building in the Abdeen neighborhood of Cairo, were reported to be police officers, and one person was reported killed in the bomb that hit Haram Street in the Giza district of Cairo.

Sinai insurgent group Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis claimed responsibility for all four bombings across the capital today. The group previously claimed responsibility for an attack on a police checkpoint in Beni Suef on January 23 that killed five police officers.

Sources and further details are available as part of an* ongoing project to document the casualties.

Up to 25 demonstrations are reportedly planned across the country tomorrow on the third anniversary of the 2011 revolution, including a march at the Journalists Syndicate in Cairo.

—Photo credit: Cairo Security Directorate - YOUM7/Kareem Abdul Kareem

*let’s not be coy: said project is mine.

Hieronymus Bosch – The Music Written on This Dude's Butt

chaoscontrolled123:

Luke and I were looking at Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights and discovered, much to our amusement, music written upon the posterior of one of the many tortured denizens of the rightmost panel of the painting which is intended to represent Hell. I decided to transcribe it into modern notation, assuming the second line of the staff is C, as is common for chants of this era.

so yes this is LITERALLY the 600-years-old butt song from hell

5:07
Un-sanctioned education

About:

The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire. - Ferdinand Foch